January 17–20, 2017 Sands Expo Center Las Vegas, Nevada Too Good to Miss

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livestream11HighQ called 2015 the year of video marketing. Seventy-eight percent of people watch videos online each week. Fifty-five percent of people watch videos online every day. Using the word “video” in an email subject line increases open rates and click-throughs.

Anyone wanting to get in the video content game knows that rounding up customers for great testimonials can take a lot of time and planning. Gathering people who are influential in your industry to create engaging video content that your customers want to watch and share with their friends takes significant effort.

Wait a minute: All these people—all the people you need to create video marketing content—will be in one place at the same time. They will all be at SHOT Show.

SHOT Show is the perfect opportunity to create some fantastic video content that will not only get a lot of traction at the show, but will have a significant shelf life afterwards, as video content that can be used on your website and in your marketing efforts throughout the year.

Man On the Street Interviews

Guns.com put together a great compilation video at the 2015 SHOT Show that explores the topic of diversity in the gun industry. Take a look at that video and then think about a topic around which you might want to create a video.

Now, I know it’s tempting to focus on your products or services, but think about the bigger picture. If you sell bows, do not ask people what they love about your brand. Instead, ask them to tell a story about their first memory of bow hunting. If you are trying to attract new people to the shooting sports, ask booth visitors to share a story about who had the biggest positive influence on them to get into shooting sports. Remember the 70/20/10 Rule I talked about in my post about building a Twitter following.

Customer Interviews

There is a lot to be said for unbiased customer reviews. A customer review carries a lot more weight than anything you can say about your own product or service. Ask your customers what products they find most useful. Ask them which features of a product they don’t use and why they don’t use them. And go ahead and ask them if there is anything they wished your company offered.

This kind customer feedback is valuable information you otherwise would never acquire so directly. Not only do you find out what people love, which you can then can share that with your potential customers, you find out what features you are either wasting time developing, as well as those that are misunderstood and need better clarification or instruction. Finally, asking customers what they wish you provided is gold to your product development team.

That said, when working with video at the SHOT Show, it’s worth repeating that you do not need to focus solely on your products or services. You can also ask people stopping by your booth what one problem is they would like to solve in 2016. Or ask them what the biggest challenges are they face in their day-to-day operations. This will give you some insight into ways your company can help solve or eliminate their biggest issues. Video such as this can also accompany instructional and educational content you create in response to these interviews.

I Have to Hire a Camera Pro, Right?

You do not need to hire a professional videographer to create your videos. Just follow some basic best practices like I suggested in my last post and you can shoot a great video that people will want to watch and share with their friends.

The most important thing to remember about creating video marketing content is to think about the bigger picture you want your brand attached to. Come up with a question or two that addresses that topic, then hit that record button and start filming.

 

TBrowneTraci Browne has spent the last 15 years in the trade show industry. Much of that time was spent teaching exhibitors how to get more from their trade show marketing dollars and teaching show producers how to structure their shows to make their sponsors and exhibitors happier. She is also the author of the book The Social Trade Show – Leveraging Social Media and Virtual Events to Connect With Your Customers.